Verbal Agreement Synonym

Konkordat is a French word for a formal agreement between two or more parties. It is synonymous with words like compact and covenant, but in the seventeenth century it was named as the official name for an agreement between church and state to settle ecclesiastical affairs. A historic concordat was concluded in 1801 between Napoleon Bonaparte, first consul and Pope Pius VII. It defined the status of the Roman Catholic Church in France and regulated relations between Church and State. The French word derives from the Latin compromissum, itself related to the old compromittere party (promittere means « to promise »). In English, compromit has been used as a synonym for compromise verb in its outdated sense « to bind by mutual agreement » and, in its modern sense, « the alteration of the cause ». If you remember, harmony is also synonymous with grammatical agreement. Accord appears in Old English with the meaning « reconcile » or « reconcile », borrowed from its Anglo-French etymon, acorder, a word related to the Latin concordāre, which means « to agree ». This original sense of agreement is transitive, and in modern English it still occurs, but rarely. His transitive sense of « giving or giving according to what is appropriate, due or deserved » – as in « The teacher`s students pay tribute to him » – is more frequently encountered.

However, the contract may refer to any agreement between two or more parties that is legally enforceable. As a general rule, a contract establishes in each party the obligation to do something (e.B. to provide goods or services at a fixed price and according to a specific schedule). It may also be mandatory not to do something (for example. B provide sensitive business information). Another known use of the convention is in law and politics, where it is used as a term for an agreement between two or more groups (countries or political organizations) to settle issues that concern everyone, for example the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. There are also the Geneva Conventions, a series of four international conventions (1864, 1906, 1929, 1949) signed in Geneva, Switzerland, which established the humanitarian principles that signatory states must treat military and civilian nationals of an enemy in time of war. . . .